http://tjez.gob.mx/perdakosis/6181 more tips here hydrea cost ECOSHELTA has long been part of the sustainable building revolution and makes high quality architect designed, environ­mentally minimal impact, pre­fabricated, modular buildings, using latest technologies. Our state of the art building system has been used for cabins, houses, studios, eco-tourism acco­mmodation and villages. We make beautiful spaces, the applications are endless, the potential exciting.

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my site This project was located on the north western region of Tasmania’s remote and rugged Bruny Island. Only just over an hour drive from Hobart however needing a ferry to get there – this beautiful island is the quintessential Tasmanian wilderness experience.

Eco tourism building

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site de rencontres limoges influence http://arthurdavidfischer.com/91389-elocon-cream-price.html Project Brief:

Design and build a sustainable and environmentally friendly two-bedroom house for our clients to live in permanently. Also, two free standing, self-catering environmentally focused eco pods for the purpose of tourist accommodation. All buildings should be designed to incorporate the stunning views on offer; looking out over Quarantine Bay.

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This location is not only situated on the remote Bruny Island and therefore all materials had to be delivered to site via ferry however this location was bordering an area of significant conservation value with both the Quarantine Bay State Reserve and Marks Point Conservation Area bordering the property.

Bruny Island due to it remoteness is famous for the abundance of wildlife and is seen as a safe haven for endangered species such as the Swift Parrot and Forty Spotted Pardalote.

The areas surrounding the site also had areas of significant Aboriginal cultural value.

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Being situated on such a remote island in such an environmentally sensitive, coastal location Ecoshelta http://amazingmarbella.com/?menstryaciy=rencontres-ludiques&f97=a6 eco pods were the perfect answer. With the majority of works being carried out in Ecoshelta’s Hobart factory this prevented the damages of high human traffic associated with a traditional building site. Similarly, the Kettering ferry is only small and therefore a completely fabricated and modular design was not plausible. Ecoshelta delivered the entire building in a ‘kit of parts’ – with Ecoshelta’s aluminium framing ideal in preventing the corrosion associated with coastal buildings. The short building period of four months was enough time to have the project complete and ready for reservations leading into the busy Easter holiday period.

Ecoshelta’s unique footing system meant that minimal concrete was used in the construction. Small (removable) footings 600mm x 600m were set out in a 2.5 metre grid along the building. Furthermore, Ecoshelta’s telescopic footing system allowed the building to sit above the ground without preventing the natural movement of water, soils & seeds, flora & fauna.

The passive design elements of the house with large eaves, double glazing, building positioning and louvre windows allows for easy control of internal buildings temperatures. The use of wood pellet fireplace was also a sustainable measure to ensure that energy required for heating was provided using minimal and recycled materials. All timbers for the buildings were sustainable source and locally produced native Tasmanian species meeting all FSC standards.

All water for site is harvested through rainwater catchments and the highly advanced aerated wastewater system has allowed for safe native garden bed transpiration.

Replanting of native understorey, mid-storey and upper-storey  vegetation will allow for a fully restored, environmentally sound building site in years to follow with plenty of habitat for native fauna.

Please find more at www.freespiritpods.com

Eco pod. Single pod with kitchen and en suite.

 

Prefabricated and sustainable.

 

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Sustainably sourced Australian timber.

 


July 24th, 2019

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Two pavilion 6 e.pod with 2 extension dwelling on a sloping coastal site. This pavilion was constructed using an alternate laminated structural timber frame and site constructed frame, cladding and lining and included a lower floor masonry element.


August 4th, 2016

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Two pavilion e.pod small house on a rock strewn cliff face site heavily treed with mature Angophoras that have all been retained and the building worked around the existing site features.  The footings are directly on the natural rocks. Extensive screened louvred glazing and natural stack ventilation strategies.

 

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August 1st, 2016

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First two e.pod cabins with ensuite extension for a beachfront resort on an island close to the main island of Vanuatu. The transport of all parts and fit out in sea containers from Sydney to the local port with all parts ferried to the remote island site by local canoe. An Ecoshelta supervisor trained and worked with a local assembly crew.


August 1st, 2016

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The first of our e.pod projects to use the new composite panel systems for floors, walls and roof elements. The remote rural site in the upper Hawkesbury, 4WD access and steep approach required shipment in smaller hardened vehicles. This cabin was designed as a single E.pod cabin with ensuite and bed side extensions, and large extended deck out to view and north over river. The site has an autonomous site with composting WC, rainwater harvesting, sullage dispersal and stand alone battery storage solar power system. A mezzanine loft and awnings were added later.


August 1st, 2016

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Two e.pods with ensuite side extension accommodation cabins for a boutique ecotourism venture in southern Tasmania. This project had a limited site build time and required close coordination.  Disabled access was also integrated into the project. Rainwater harvesting, sullage dispersal and Clivus Multrum composting WC systems were used.


August 1st, 2016

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This project consisted of two E.pods and two extensions as a granny flat on a rural property, specified to meet the NSW SEPP Housing Codes. No Council approval was required. The external finish was Colourbond with miniorb linings for the bathroom and kitchen and incorporated a large timber decking area.

This building has since been relocated to the ACT intact by large low loader.


August 1st, 2016

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This site was an existing derelict masonry building which was stabilised using a new customised Ecoshelta alloy framing system with a new 4 pod upper floor with surrounding terrace.  The design included a cellar and courtyard with small pool. This project used an experimental phase change saline pod with thermal performance nodules in thick limestone paved floors, with solar powered floor heating system. The central bond features a geometric alloy framed timber tread staircase. The internal walls were traditional lime hard plastered and remain unpainted. Recycled timbers were extensively used throughout and the louvred shutters were created from old timber fence – recycled frame and palings for blades. The kitchen benches were made from recycled builders planks.


August 1st, 2016

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This impressive three pavilion 8 e.pod frame house surrounds a central sheltered courtyard in a beautiful but extremely exposed site in the Bass Straight islands. The hybrid structure used a site poured slab base and locally sourced timber cladding system and cyclone rated frame system.

 


August 1st, 2016

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Four pod and ensuite extension accommodation building for a large remote station in the Kimberly, Western Australia. This accommodation was designed for scientist accommodation to monitor the carbon storage in a reforestation project. A single 40’ sea container included the pods and all the fitout elements and hauled up the 540km driveway. Remote area power supply system, site sewerage processing system, rainwater harvesting was used. A termite protection system was included in the underfloor structure and lining and a stainless steel screening system for all openings (no glazing) was incorporated. The decking system used recycled replacement PET timber, a bamboo floor panel system, cyclone rated frame and footing system.


August 1st, 2016

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